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Archive: August - 2014 (3)

  • San Francisco’s Latest Tech Problem: Everyone Has a Job

    Article by Lauren Winklepleck, Lead Recruiter in Workbridge San Francisco   

    It seems like almost every technology-based startup in the San Francisco area is hiring for someone that is technical. Whether that be for a DevOps Engineer, Big Data/Hadoop Developer, Ruby on Rails Engineer, or a UI/UX Designer— the SF tech market is booming dramatically and now more than ever…even more than in the dotcom boom of the early 2000’s!

    Back in the first quarter of 2001 there were roughly 32,521  high tech jobs open in San Francisco whereas in Q4 of 2013 there were approximately 53, 319 open tech jobs (source: CBRE research analysis of CA employment development data). That’s a 63.9% increase in 12 years!

    So with over 50,000 open tech jobs in San Francisco, how are these startups filling their roles and capturing great talent?

    There are a several ways these startups are filling their roles— the most effective way, I’ve observed, is keeping in touch with personal networks as well as expanding them.

    Successful hiring managers are reaching out to past colleagues, buddies from college, and even developers they overhear doing a technical phone interview on the MUNI train! 

    In San Francisco, specifically, software engineers have a 2% unemployment rate compared to 4.4% unemployment nationwide. The job market for engineers is hotter than ever, meaning companies will do whatever it takes to make their next great hire.

    As startups continue to receive more funding, more tech jobs will open, which will continue to make the competition for candidates harder than ever—this trend shows no sign of slowing. It’s exciting to see where the San Francisco tech market will be a year from now!

  • The Growing Relationship Between Tech and Education

    Article by Christine Arnold, Lead Marketing Specialist in Workbridge Chicago.

    It’s crazy how much back-to-school checklists have changed since I was in school. I remember how excited I used to get to pick out a new matching set of folders, a pack of fancy roller-ball pens, a trapper-keeper I could decorate with white-out doodles. Fine, maybe I was an office-supply nerd. But those lists these days read a little differently. My sister is going into her freshman year of High School this year, and I was shocked when she told me that her school required the use of tablets in place of text books. Computers? In the classroom? I wasn’t even allowed to remove my Walkman from my backpack while I was on premises!

    She has the option of bringing her own tablet, or of renting one from the school. I assume there’s some sort of financial aid system in place to provide them to students who can’t afford the rental fees. Then, a week before school starts, the students are invited to a mandatory orientation where instructors walk them through which apps to download, and how to navigate them once they do. You’re probably wondering what’s stopping these kids from playing Angry Birds all class. The apps lock down the device so that they can’t access other applications.

    All of this got me thinking about the growing relationship between technology and education. What else is out there that wasn’t around while I was in school? Well, it as it turns out, there’s a lot. In Chicago alone, we’ve got an array of companies doing some really amazing things in the education space. Packback Books, a company that was recently featured on SharkTank, is making huge waves in the textbook industry. They offer affordable short-term rentals of many college textbooks, and their inventory is only continuing to grow. How amazing would that option have been when you were in school? I know I spent upwards of $1000 each semester on my textbooks alone. It would’ve been nice to put some of that money toward tuition instead.

    Another really cool company is Overgrad. They’re a student tracking system that helps create awareness about colleges starting day-1 of your freshman year of high school. They use student data to project which colleges the student will be a good fit for. I’m pretty sure I didn’t even start thinking about college until after I took the ACT my junior year. Not that I regret my decisions, but I imagine that whole process would have been much less overwhelming if the onslaught of information had been gradual. And think about kids in lower income or rural areas, where going to college isn’t necessarily a given. Starting students off prepared and with realistic goals and expectations, and the chance to alter their performance based on those goals, will set them up for a life of success. It gives them more control over their own future.

    If you’re interested in learning about more Chicago companies revolutionizing education, check out this event we’re sponsoring on August 20th: Back to School Ed Tech Demos & Drinks.

  • The Power of a Thank You Note

    Article by Anneika Kerr, Lead Recruiter in Workbridge Boston

    In your job search, chances are you will be introduced to a variety of companies and, most importantly, to many people. Therefore following up those interactions to show your appreciation can positively impact both your job search and your future. In fact, studies have found that a “thank you” note can help you land a new job.

    ·         90% of hiring managers said that being thanked for a job interview had a helpful impact on the candidate’s chances

    ·         Over 80% of hiring managers stated that email and phone calls are appropriate ways to thank an employer

    These notes shouldn’t be long and laborious; instead, it is always best to be concise but memorable. Your note should cover 3 parts: appreciation for their time, why you would be a good fit for the role and in the company, and mention of the future. See below an example:

    Hi Rick –

    It was wonderful meeting you on Monday for an initial interview. I appreciate you taking the time to explain to me how Spear Mint, Inc. works and what you’re looking for in a developer for your team.

    We’d spoken about the need for a full stack developer who understands how to design a simple solution for a complex problem. While at Bubble Yum, Inc. I’d worked on two projects from soup to nuts and feel confidently that my skill set would be an asset on your team.

    I look forward to continuing our conversation with your team in the future.

    Best,

    Solomon

    No hiring manager is looking for a 2 page letter. Just a few quick thoughts on why you are a great fit is all that’s needed. These notes assist in the building of a relationship between you and the interviewer, as well as their company. Here in our SF office, we have seen the benefits countless times.  

    Recently we worked with a candidate, Mike, who was newly on the job market. He mentioned a response he had received, a year prior, to a thank you note he had written. During the initial interview process, he’d found another job and let the manager know while also thanking him for his time. The response Bob received was to get back in touch if he was ever looking again, so he had us reach out. After two interviews and two more thank you notes – my office congratulated him on his new job with that same manager.

    That is the power of a thank you note. 

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